10 Tips to Help You Stop Wasting Your Skin Care Products!

The average woman spends $15,000 on beauty products in her lifetime according to In Style. Some sources peg that number at $2000 per year.

Maybe those numbers aren’t in your budget, but chances are, you have put a few dollars here and there toward your looks. Make sure you are getting the most bang for your buck by following these product usage guidelines.

As a licensed Esthetician, my general mantra to clients is “move the product, not your face!”  In other words, you should be applying enough product, whether its cleanser, serum, moisturizer or sunscreen, so that it can be spread across the desired surface without pulling or tugging on the skin.

How much product exactly, well that depends on the product, your skin, and the purpose.

Prepping your skin properly has a huge effect as well. Trying to apply moisturizer to skin that still has leftover makeup on it (and lots of ladies do this!) won’t cut it. Literally: makeup is designed to sit on the surface, by nature it is a little bit occlusive. Think BB cream. Cleanse your skin well! Moisturizer, no matter how much you apply, won’t fully penetrate dirty skin. WASTE!

Soap, when mixed with water is usually quite alkaline, and alkalinity disrupts the barrier function of skin. Your skins’ job is to keep bad stuff (think bacteria and environmental toxins) out, and moisture in. An alkaline skin will desperately absorb more product to repair that barrier! WASTE! Use a gentle cleanser instead of soap. Over cleansing and over exfoliating will do that too. Cleanse no more than 2x day, and reach for a gentle scrub no more than 2-3x per week. Using a scrub 1x per week in the winter months is plenty. Your esthetician can help you choose the perfect cleanser or exfoliant.
soap
How much skin care product to use? Keep in mind that when applying product to your face, you should include the face, front and back of the neck, and décolleté all the way to the bra line. These areas will age!  Most women (and men!) forget to address these spots, and wind up wearing high cut shirts and scarves as they get older. Now that’s a waste. Why spend money on good skin care, and not put it on all of your skin? WASTE!

How you apply product can make or break your beauty budget. Pumping a dollop of moisturizer on your fingertips, and trying to spread that over your target area will result in a lot of unnecessary pulling, tugging, and uneven application, not to mention more product. Skin care should be applied directly to clean damp hands, spread briefly over the palms, and press, press, press!  Press on the forehead, cheeks, chin, neck, décolleté, THEN spread. This ensures even distribution, and less waste. Start with damp hands please, or your hands will absorb it before your face. WASTE!

Cleanser: depending on how concentrated it is, usually a quarter sized amount will do. Spend some time actually cleansing the skin; give the product time to work. 1-2 minutes is good to shoot for.

Toner / hydrating mist: Today’s “toners” are not the alcohol laden dry-bombs of the 1980s and 90s. But you might want to check your product labels! Lots of popular brands are still using way too much drying alcohol. Its a cheap ingredient. Not all alcohol is bad, its used to keep ingredients dissolved and sometimes preserved. Cetearyl alcohol is actually moisturizing, but SD or “denatured” alcohol, especially if its one of the first 3 ingredients, not so much…

Many excellent product lines today have taken advantage of the “toning” step to incorporate serious hydrating ingredients like sodium lactate and hyaluronic acid to pre-saturate the skin.Think of the skin like a sponge: a wet sponge picks up more moisture faster than a dry sponge. Translation: you can use less product, and it will spread more easily. Use your hydrating mist / toner, and use less product! No WASTE!

Serum: is it a gel based serum, or a lipid (oil) base? A dime sized amount of a gel serum should do the trick. A lipid based serum however, usually only requires a few drops, spread quickly over the palms, and pressed gently onto the skin. Lipid serums are usually not intended to be “massaged”.

Eye cream: aim for a pea sized amount, applied only to the middle fingertips. Again, press between the fingertips first, then press around the eye area, then gently spread. Eye creams are super concentrated and often spendy, so don’t WASTE it! But do use enough to see the benefits. (Pun intended)

Moisturizer: generally go for a quarter sized amount, now applied to freshly cleansed, pre-hydrated skin, and press press press! Follow up with gently spreading all over the face, front and back of neck, and décolleté.

Sunscreen: usually the same as moisturizer, and apply to all the same areas. Some formulations differ based on the micron size of the active ingredients (I prefer zinc and titanium dioxide) so check the label for specific instructions.

What ever product you may have left on your palms, apply to the back of your hands! This area (along with eyes and neck) is one of the first to show age. It only takes a few moments, and you don’t want to WASTE the opportunity to protect your skin…

The most important thing you can do to avoid WASTE, is to see your friendly neighborhood esthetician, who is a licensed skin care professional! S/he can analyze your skin and condition, and make product recommendations that are best suited to your skin. There is no need to WASTE good money on bad or unsuitable skin care products.  What are you going to do with all that $$$$ you’ll save?

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Let us know what you think in the comments 🙂

#smartskinrules'Move the product, not

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Beautiful Skin = Healthy Function

Its all about Function

Healthy Skin functions well. Looking good is a side effect.

Our precious skin has a lot of responsibilities: barrier, temperature control, immune defense, sensation, keeping us from dissolving into a wet blob of mush…

The function of our skin is affected by our environment and our lifestyle choices. Specifically: diet, exercise, sun exposure, how we care for ourselves…

These things also affect our overall wellness. Conveniently, our skin can actually reflect our overall wellness too.

Poorly functioning skin looks:

Dull

Dry

Sallow

Blah

Well functioning skin looks:

Glowing!

Hydrated!

Bright!

Vibrant!

I don’t know about you, but I prefer glowing and vibrant over dull and blah any day.

So how do we get that glowy thing, and make it last?

Diet and healthy lifestyle choices are the most important, but we have a secret weapon…

ascpfacial

(photo courtesy of ASCP)

Something that brightens the dull!

Juices up the dry!

Enlightens the sallow!

Banishes the blah!

Its called professional skin care, and you should try it. A qualified skin care professional can assess your skin, make recommendations and perform treatments that will support healthy function.  As a side benefit, you just might look a bit younger and healthier 🙂

Understanding Freckles and Age Spots: Mr Fitzpatrick and the Umbrella Factories

In my skin care practice, one of the most common concerns clients have is hyperpigmentation, or spots. We aren’t talking about those cute little spots on puppies, kittens and baby deer.

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Nope, this is about those spots otherwise known as liver spots, age spots, old lady dots, leopard spots or just plain old freckles.

In order to manage these discolorations, its helpful to understand how and why they appear.

Those spots are made in your skin from a pigment called melanin, in our clinic we refer to it as an “umbrella.” They are made in specialized skin cells called melanocytes, or “umbrella factories.”3

Everyone’s skin has these little umbrella factories in their skin, but some of them are way more efficient than others.

In 1976, a Harvard dermatologist named Thomas B Fitzpatrick developed a scale to identify skin color, now know as the Fitzpatrick Scale. To find your “Fitz type”, check this out.

  • Type I (scores 0–6) Pale white; blond or red hair; blue eyes; freckles — Always burns, never tans
  • Type II (scores 7–13) White; fair; blond or red hair; blue, green or hazel eyes — Usually burns, tans minimally
  • Type III (scores 14–20) Cream white; fair with any hair or eye color; quite common — Sometimes mild burn, tans uniformly
  • Type IV (scores 21–27) Moderate brown; typical Mediterranean skin tone — Rarely burns, always tans well
  • Type V (scores 28–34) Dark brown; Middle Eastern skin types — Very rarely burns, tans very easily
  • Type VI (scores 35+) Deeply pigmented dark brown to black — Never burns, tans very easily

Unfortunately, if you happen to be albino, this scale won’t apply to you, and you should probably invest in some serious SPF my friend…

A234533_fitzpatrick_scale_rev

If you are blessed with Fitz 1 or 2, you can pretty much kiss any dreams of a Coppertone tan right out the window. No matter how much you try to bake your skin to a deep golden hue, you will only get freckles. Lots and lots of freckles. Maybe enough to look like a tan, but you are way better off going the spray tan route.

Fitz 3 and 4 are currently the fashion industry faves, they can tan evenly and are generally resilient to sun, unless they overdo it, and then they look old elephant butt. No offense to elephants…

www.viriditas.skincaretherapy.net

Fitz 5 and 6 are the bronze Gods and Goddesses of skin tone, their tone even and deep, resistant to wrinkles and solar radiation damage. However…

Let’s go back to those factories. Everyone has the same number of factories (melanocytes) in their skin. It just a matter of whose factories are most efficient and long lasting.

Fitz 1 and 2 could use better general managers working for them. Umbrella production can be slow to start, and uneven, resulting in burns and freckling.

Because they tan so easily, Fitz 3 and 4 have a tendency to overdo the sun, which can make the factories burn out, resulting in hypo-pigmentation (lack of color, white spots) and a leathery look.

Fitz 5 and 6 have the super-duper high efficiency models that work overtime, even when not needed. In fact, anytime their skin gets irritated, even a little, they get boatloads of umbrellas delivered to that spot. Think about the spots that show up after a blemish, a cut or an insect bite. For you, this translates to NO SCRUBS! And I don’t care what you read on the internet, microdermabrasion is a big honking NO-NO for you.

In a nutshell, the skin cells get exposed to sun (or other threat), send out a distress call to the factories, and the factories respond with a quick delivery of umbrellas for protection.

Of course, other factors will rev up production as well, think hormones, inflammation, illness…(that’s a whole other post!)

Got it?

So if you want to avoid spots, you need to protect your skin. Avoid prolonged exposure, cover up with protective clothing, hats, sunglasses, and wear SPF.

No distress call, no umbrellas. Mr. Fitzpatrick can take the day off.